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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL ROBERT TAYLOR PRINTS BY TITLE

Robert Taylor Prints

Robert Taylor Prints . com

All of the superb range of aviation and naval art prints by renowned artist Robert Taylor, in one easy to navigate gallery.  Listing all prints from the RAF, Luftwaffe, United States Air Force and more - all of Robert Taylor's prints in one place.  Robert Taylor Prints . com show all available aviation and naval prints published over the years by the Military Gallery, available from Cranston Fine Arts, the Military and Aviation Art Print Company. Order with Confidence with Cranston Fine Arts aviation art publisher and distributor for over 24 years.

 


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

 

Aviation Print Packs
Pilot / Aircrew Signed Mosquito Prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
Mosquito into Attack by Robert Taylor
Mosquito into Attack by Robert Taylor
Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)

Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Save £130!
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Canadian Spitfire Aviation Prints by Robert Taylor.
Canadian Wing by Robert Taylor

Canadian Wing by Robert Taylor
Greycap Leader by Robert Taylor.

Greycap Leader by Robert Taylor.
Price £
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Signed Battle of Britain Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Head on Attack by Robert Taylor

Head on Attack by Robert Taylor
41 Squadron Spitfires by Ivan Berryman.

41 Squadron Spitfires by Ivan Berryman.
Save £170!
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Pack 573. Pack of two WW2 Spitfire combat prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Robert Taylor.
Head to Head by Nicolas Trudgian

Head to Head by Nicolas Trudgian
Ramrod by Robert Taylor (B)

Ramrod by Robert Taylor (B)
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Pack 757. Pack of two Thunderbolt prints by Robert Taylor.
The Wolfpack by Robert Taylor. (B)

The Wolfpack by Robert Taylor. (B)
Thunderbolt Strike by Robert Taylor.

Thunderbolt Strike by Robert Taylor.
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Latest Robert Taylor  Releases : 

 When Hitler invaded Poland the British found themselves at war - and isolated.  Desperate for new fighters and with production at full capacity they turned to the US aircraft manufacturer North American Aviation who were convinced they had the answer for Britain's needs - but it was still on the drawing board.  They were, however, sure they could meet the deadline and incredibly, within the space of just four months the company had their brand new machine in the air.  The Mustang was a triumph - conceived and born in a shorter period than any other significant aircraft in history and testament to its designer Edgar Schmued, and the people who built it.  Delivered to the RAF in October 1941, it was fast, manoeuvrable, hard-hitting and, by the time it was combined with the legendary Rolls-Royce Merlin engine, was capable of outperforming anything the enemy could throw at it.  With the arrival of the long-range fighter the heavy bombers of the USAAF could now be escorted all the way to the German capital and back so whilst the RAF pounded Berlin at night, the Mighty Eighth would do the same by day.  When P-51s first appeared in the skies over Berlin, Hermann Goering was reported to have announced that he knew then the war was lost.  Like the Spitfire, a special new breed of men flew the Mustang as the Allies pushed for victory in Europe.  Tough, supremely confident, determined, and gloriously brave; it was an era that belonged to them and the P-51 helped produce some of the greatest aces of the war.  Such iconic pilots as George Preddy, John Meyer, Don Blakeslee, Kit Carson and Bud Anderson scored all or most of their victories in this thoroughbred fighter.  In fact, the Mustang was responsible for more US victories than any other fighter of the war.  In this painting, P-51Ds of the 352nd Fighter Group with full long-range tanks slung under their wings, head out from their forward base in Belgium on an extended sweep east of the Rhine crossing on the lookout for enemy aircraft, in the spring of 1945.

Looking for Trouble by Robert Taylor.
For nearly a thousand years the white cliffs of southern England had taunted many a foreign army.  These fortress walls of chalk, however, were defended by the moat-like waters of the Channel, and together they had shielded the British from her enemies.  Alongside Drake they had defied the armies of Spain and her great Armada and, in 1805, had halted the march of Napoleon's <i>Grand Armée</i>.  No enemy force since that of William the Conqueror in 1066 had successfully managed to cross the Channel in anger but, in May 1940, one of the most powerful armies the world had ever seen arrived at Calais.  An invasion by Hitler's all-conquering Wehrmacht was imminent - or so it seemed.  To cross the Channel and breach the English defences, the Luftwaffe simply had to gain control of the skies, and with massively superior numbers the outcom seemed inevitable.  The fate of Britain lay in the hands of less than 3,000 young airmen from Fighter Command - Churhill's 'Few'.  By July the most famous air battle in history was underway and, over the next three months under tranquil summer skies, the 'Few' battled to defend their Scpetred Isle.  Impossibly outnumbered and flying daily to the point of exhaustion, by October these courageous young men had snatched victory from the jaws of defeat, emerging defiantly victorious.  The threat of invasion might be over but a terrible price had been paid - during that long battle for the survival of Britain 544 had been killed and 422 wounded; and of those who survived a further 814 would be killed before the end of the war.  This painting pays tribute to the valiant 'Few', portraying a fleeting moment of calm for the pilots of 74 (Tiger) Squadron during the height of the Battle of Britain.  With his commanding officer Sailor Malan (ZP-A) to his right, Acting Flight Lieutenant John Freeborn (ZP-C) takes time to reflect on another day of intense combat while passing over the white cliffs and the familiar lighthouse at Beachy Head, as the squadron cross the English coast to head for home.

This Sceptred Isle by Robert Taylor.
 Following their victory at Midway, American forces had fought a long, bloody and bitter campaign to retake the Japanese held islands in the Pacific.  By the end of March 1945, however, they had finally captured Iwo Jima and looked towards Okinawa, a province of Japan itself.  But the closer the fighting came to Japan, the greater was the enemy's resistance.  The five-week long battle for Iwo Jima had been bloody, brutal and costly with over 26,000 US Marine casualties.  Of the 21,000-strong Japanese garrison on the island less than 300 prisoners had been taken; the rest refusing to surrender, preferring to fight to the death or commit 'honourable' ritual suicide.  Now the Allied attention turned to the island of Okinawa.  Annexed by Japan in the late nineteenth century and less than 400 miles south of its mainland, it was the place from which the Allied invasion of Japan must be launched.  Supported by a huge naval presence, including one of the largest British fleets ever assembled, the assault began on 1st April 1945 with the largest amphibious landing of the Pacific war - six US Divisions landed during what has been referred to as a <i>typhoon of steel</i>.  Japan's response was ferocious seeing the peak of the kamikaze scourge and the Allied fighter pilots, whilst providing ground support to the advancing infantry, desperately attempted to defend the naval fleet from unrelenting attacks.  While the British ships with their steel decks fared much better, the kamikazes took their toll on the US fleet, highlighting a conflict worse than anything seen before.  The 82 day battle was one of the most severe and bloody campaigns of WWII, accounting for over 14,000 Allied deaths and five times that number of Japanese soldiers.  This painting depicts USMC Ace Dean Caswell and F4U Corsairs from VMF-221, based on the carrier USS Bunker Hill climbing away from the target area after delivering a blistering rocket attack on enemy positions on Okinawa.

Okinawa by Robert Taylor.
 It was one of the fastest operational aircraft in the world, one of the most envied - and one of the most feared. Built almost entirely of wood and assembled by carpenters, the beautifully streamlined de Havilland Mosquito, or <i>Wooden Wonder</i> was a triumph of ingenuity at a time when resources of light alloys were in short supply.  Its greatest attribute was speed.  Powered by two phenomenal Rolls-Royce Merlin engines, the Mosquito became the finest multi-role combat aircraft of World War II.  No other Allied military aircraft was built in so many versions for so many roles - a fast bomber which could carry a huge 4,000lb payload; a day or night fighter; a fighter-bomber; trainer; torpedo bomber; photo reconnaissance aircraft; maritime strike aircraft and U-boat hunter were just some of the 43 different variants produced during a long and distinguished career.  Mosquitos had pioneered the role of daring precision attacks with the September 1942 raid on the Gestapo Headquarters in Oslo and were involved in the first unescorted high-speed bombing raids on Germany.  It was the Mosquito strike wings of Coastal Command, however, that endured some of the fiercest battles of the war.  Flying over the unforgiving icy waters of the North Sea to attack enemy shipping along the coasts of Norway, Denmark and Hollad meant that precision flying was essential for survival; especially in the deep, sheer fjords where even the slightest lapse in concentration could result in instant destruction.  In this painting, Mosquito Mk.VIs from No.143 Sqn, part of the famous Banff Strike Wing, come under intense defensive fire whilst delivering a blistering strike on enemy shipping off the Norwegian coast in early 1945.  Their salvo of rockets, however, will likely be enough to penetrate the hulls of the ships.

Devastating Strike by Robert Taylor.

 

FEATURED SIGNATURE



Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth A Walsh (deceased)

Ken Walsh was born in Brooklyn, New York, on November 24th 1916. On December 15th 1933, Kenneth Walsh joined the Marines, becoming a mechanic and radioman. In April 1937 he received his wings while still a Private, but was promoted to Corporal immediately after. Ken Walsh achieved an impressive 2... full profile available on profile page.

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Other Aviation Artists

Featured Aircraft



Horsley

The Hawker Horsley was the last wooden aircraft to be constructed by Hawker. It was designed initially in 1923 but modified in 1925 to meet the need for torpedoes. In January 1927, No.11 Squadron were equipped with Horsleys and then No.100 Squadron. In 1928, No.33 and No.15 Squadron were also equipped with Horsleys. The first torpedo bomber versions were used by No.36 squadron from June 1928, being sent to Singapore shortly thereafter. No Horsleys were built after February 1934.

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All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 Fl. Lt. Ken Evans DFC is depicted flying Spitfire Mk Vc BR471 over Grand Harbour, Malta, during his posting to 126 Sqn in 1942 where he was credited with 5 enemy aircraft destroyed, 3 damaged and a further 3 probables. He was awarded the DFC in December 1942.

Spitfires Over Malta - Flt Lt Ken Evans DFC by Ivan Berryman.
 Born of Croatian parents in Sarajevo in 1893, Friedrich Navratil served under the Austro Hungarian flag throughout his considerable military career, becoming an outstanding pilot with Flik 3J on the Italian Front. He is depicted here chasing down a Hanriot of 72A Squadriglia da Caccia over Val del Concei in August 1918 to claim his third of ten victories. Navratil's distictive Albatross D.III (Oef) 253.06 was easily identifiable by his personalised 'Pierced Heart' emblem and is unusual in sporting the then new Balkenkeuz cross, untypical of Austro-Hungarian aircraft in WW1.

Oblt Friedrich Navratil by Ivan Berryman.
 Spitfire P9433 DW-E of  No.610 flown by P/O Pegge, in which he shot down two Bf.109Es on 12th August 1940.

Tribute to Pilot Officer Pegge of No.610 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
 The Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG 54 Erich Rudorffer is depicted in Fw190A-6 'Black Double Chevron' over the misty forests of Finland in June 1944. Credited with 222 aerial victories, he survived being shot down no less than sixteen times and survived the war until eventually passing away in 2016 aged 98.

Erich Rudorffer by Ivan Berryman.
 F/Lt Warner was shot down in combat with Bf 109s on 16th August 1940 at 17:15hrs off Dungeness.  He was flying Spitfire DW-Z (R6802).

Tribute to Flight Lieutenant Warner of No.610 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Spitfire DW-U (W3455) of 610 Squadron escorting Blenheims to Le Trait on 21st August 1941.  This aircraft was shot down by enemy fighters on this mission.

Escorting Blenheims to Le Trait - Spitfire W3455 of No.610 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 During the Falklands conflict in 1982, the tiny mid-Atlantic volcanic island of Ascension became the starting point for the <i>Black Buck</i> missions - a relay of tanker aircraft refueling two Vulcan bombers to attack Argentine positions and damage the runway at Port Stanley to prevent the use of fast jets.  At the time these were the longest range bombing missions in history.

Ascension Departure by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 During the Falklands conflict in 1982, the tiny mid-Atlantic volcanic island of Ascension became the starting point for the <i>Black Buck</i> missions - a relay of tanker aircraft refueling two Vulcan bombers to attack Argentine positions and damage the runway at Port Stanley to prevent the use of fast jets.  At the time these were the longest range bombing missions in history.

Vulcan at Ascension, 1982 by Ivan Berryman. (P)

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Signatures

Some popular pilot and aircrew signatures from our database of over 2,000 signatures!

Gunther Rall

Johnnie Johnson

Bud Anderson

 
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Selected prints with Free Shipping

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Thunderheads Over Ridgewell by Robert Taylor (AP)

Thunderheads Over Ridgewell by Robert Taylor (AP)
Price : £395.00
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A Time for Heroes by Robert Taylor (AP)

A Time for Heroes by Robert Taylor (AP)
Price : £395.00
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Offshore Bombardment by Robert Taylor
Offshore Bombardment by Robert Taylor
Price : £210.00
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Hornchurch Scramble by Robert Taylor.
Hornchurch Scramble by Robert Taylor.
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Russian Roulette by Robert Taylor (AP)

Russian Roulette by Robert Taylor (AP)
Price : £375.00
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Royal Air Force - Luftwaffe - US Air Force - Naval Art - Modern Aircraft - Full Print List

 The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

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