Robert Taylor Prints . com

All of the superb range of aviation and naval art prints by renowned artist Robert Taylor, in one easy to navigate gallery.  Listing all prints from the RAF, Luftwaffe, United States Air Force and more - all of Robert Taylor's prints in one place.  Robert Taylor Prints . com show all available aviation and naval prints published over the years by the Military Gallery, available from Cranston Fine Arts, the Military and Aviation Art Print Company. Order with Confidence with Cranston Fine Arts aviation art publisher and distributor for over 24 years.


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Aviation Print Packs
RAF Hurricane Aviation Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Simon Atack.
Undaunted by Odds by Robert Taylor.
Undaunted by Odds by Robert Taylor.
At the Setting of the Sun by Simon Atack.

At the Setting of the Sun by Simon Atack.
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Bristol Blenheim Aviation Prints by Ivan Berryman and Robert Taylor.
Most Memorable Day by Robert Taylor.

Most Memorable Day by Robert Taylor.
Ready for the Off - Blenheim of No.25 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.

Ready for the Off - Blenheim of No.25 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.
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Signed Avro Lancaster Bomber Aviation Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.
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Pack 757. Pack of two Thunderbolt prints by Robert Taylor.
The Wolfpack by Robert Taylor. (B)

The Wolfpack by Robert Taylor. (B)
Thunderbolt Strike by Robert Taylor.

Thunderbolt Strike by Robert Taylor.
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Gunther Rall Signed Battle of Britain Aviation Prints by Ivan Berryman and Robert Taylor.
High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (L)

High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (L)
Dawn Eagles Rising by Robert Taylor.
Dawn Eagles Rising by Robert Taylor.
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Latest Robert Taylor  Releases : 

 Spitfires of 616 Squadron scramble from RAF Kenley during the heavy fighting of the Battle of Britain, late August 1940.  Below them a Hurricane of 253 Squadron, sharing the same base, is being prepared for its next vital mission at a distant dispersal.  All through the long summer of 1940, as Britain stood alone, a small band of fighter pilots took part in the greatest aerial battle in history.  Day after day the men of Fighter Command valiantly took to the air to defend their country from the Luftwaffe and the threat of German invasion and Nazi tyranny.  Outnumbered, but never out-fought, they fought to the point of exhaustion and, in doing so, paid a heavy price.  But they won.

We All Stand Together by Robert Taylor.
 You can almost hear the roar of their mighty Merlin engines and feel the prop-wash in this salute to the Hawker Hurricane.  This classic portrayal of this much-loved fighter depicts a pair of Mk.I Hurricanes from No.32 Sqn leading the scramble away from their forward airfield.  Often making three, four or five such scrambles a day at the height of the battle, this time they are racing to intercept Luftwaffe intruders who have been spotted crossing the Kent coast.

Response to Call by Robert Taylor.
 You can feel the tension in this evocative painting as Messerschmitt Bf109s from 7./JG2 Richthofen head out on a long-range fighter patrol in September 1940.  With the sun behind them they hope to launch a surprise attack on unsuspecting RAF aircraft, however these enemy raiders will soon be intercepted by some of Fighter Command's most determined 'defenders of the realm'.

Eye of the Sun by Robert Taylor.
 Continuing his popular series of Giclée Studio Proofs on canvas, Robert Taylor portrays Squadron Leader 'Sailor' Malan DFC, Commanding Officer of 74 Squadron and one of the great Battle of Britain Aces, in his famous painting Height of the Battle.  Having already made one diving attack into the force of Luftwaffe He111 bombers approaching London with their fighter escort, 'Sailor' peels his Spitfire over for a second attack. Another top Ace, Pilot Officer Harbourne Stephen DFC, is hard on his heels. Below them, typifying the scene as it was on the afternoon of Wednesday 11 September 1940, Mk.I Hurricanes from 17 and 56 Squadrons have already joined the fray.
Height of the Battle by Robert Taylor. (GS)

 

FEATURED SIGNATURE



Private 1st Class Arthur Art Petersen

Serving with Fox Company, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne he was one of many paratroopers misdropped on D-Day. Landing near Sainte Mère-Église he briefly fought alongside Easy Company before heading south into the bitter fire-fight raging around the church at Angoville-au-Plain. After being wounded he was briefly treated in the Church and then fought in the advance into Carentan. He later jumped on Operation Market Garden, where he was wounded, but was back in action in time to re-join his unit in the Battle of the Bulge. Wounded yet again, Bastogne proved to be his final combat.

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All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 They came from every corner of Britain.  And mostly they were young.  These fresh faced fighter pilots, joined by an ever-growing band of volunteer airmen from the British Commonwealth and those who had managed to escape from the occupied countries of Europe would, over the summer of 1940, not only hold the world's most powerful air force at bay, they would defeat it.  Richard Taylor's stunning piece graphically conveys the conflicting realities of those deadly aerial encounters over southern England during 1940.  As the sound of Merlin engines briefly interrupts the tranquility of a sleepy English village, its residents are determined to carry on with everyday life.  In the skies overhead the bitter battle will shortly be reaching its crescendo but, for today at least, the fighting is over as Flight Sergeant George 'Grumpy' Unwin, one of the Battle of Britain's top Aces, and the Spitfire pilots of 19 Squadron return from yet another encounter with Goering's much-vaunted Luftwaffe.

Return From the Fray by Richard Taylor.
 A trio of Spitfire Mk1s of 603 Sqn based at Biggin Hill are depicted on patrol in the Summer skies above Kent during the height of the Battle of Britain in August 1940. Lead aircraft is N3288 XT-H flown by Plt Off George Gilroy who finished the war with 14 confirmed victories, 10 shared and a further 14 aircraft destroyed in actions in which he was directly involved.

Biggin Trio by Ivan Berryman.
 The air resonates to the unmistakable sound of Merlin engines as Lancasters from 630 and 57 Squadrons skim low over the Lincolnshire countryside whilst returning to their base at East Kirkby, in the summer of 1944.  RAF East Kirkby was home to Lancasters of 630 and 57 Squadrons who often flew together on long-range bombing raids including attacks against Berlin and Hitler's alpine home at Berchtesgaden.  It is of great historical importance that every print has been personally signed by one of the last surviving veterans based at RAF East Kirkby during WWII.

Return to East Kirkby by Richard Taylor.
 On the evening of 5th June 1944, at a dozen airfields across southern England, more than 13,000 American paratroopers prepared themselves for a mission that would change the course of history.  The next morning these brave young men found themselves at the forefront of the bitter fighting to secure the right flank of the Normandy beach-head.  The odds against them were huge and, if they failed, the American amphibious landings on Utah and Omaha beaches would face disaster - the destiny of the US First Army rested squarely on the shoulders of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions.

Final Roster by Anthony Saunders.
 P-47 Thunderbolts of the 509th Fighter Squadron, 405th Fighter Group, pass low over paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division advancing through heavy snow during the Battle of the Bulge, January 1945. Major Robert 'Blackie' Blackburn, in his distinctive aircraft <i>Chow Hound</i>, leads his unit as they head out on a morning low-level bombing mission.  In the early hours of 16th December 1944, out of nowhere, hundreds of panzers and thousands of troops poured forward as Hitler launched the last great German offensive of the war and, for once, the Allies had been wrong-footed.  The thinly-held Ardennes was the last place they had been expecting a counter-attack, but now three German armies were heading west across an 80-mile front.  Caught off guard the Americans rushed in reinforcements, including the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions encamped near Reims, over a hundred miles away.  Exhausted by the fighting in Holland during Operation Market Garden, they had been sent to Reims to recuperate.  They never got the chance.  Thrown into the thick of the action the 82nd helped to blunt the Germans' advance to the north, whilst at Bastogne, a pivotal town further south, the 101st, surrounded, out-numbered and besieged, refused to surrender.  The line held and three days before Christmas the panzers ground to a halt, stalled by lack of fuel.  As the weather improved the Allies could now bring their airpower into play. Hitler's last gamble had failed.

Thunder in the Ardennes by Anthony Saunders.
The practice of shooting down observation balloons was as dangerous as it was essential and none was more successful than Belgium's Adjutant Willy Coppens of the 9ème Escadrille, Aviation Militaire Belge who downed an astonishing 35 balloons, as well as two aircraft during his flying career in WW1.  He is shown here in Hanriot HD.1 No24 destroying a German Drachen balloon in the closing minutes of the day near Houthulst.

Last Kill of the Day by Ivan Berryman.
 Richard Taylor's stunning painting depicts the men of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division as they take inventory of their equipment during the early evening of 5 June 1944.  Adorned with hastily applied invasion stripes, the C-47s of the 438th Troop Carrier Group stand primed, ready to carry the elite unit to Normandy in the early hours of D-Day 1944.  To add to the poignancy of this release, the edition is personally signed by veterans that jumped on D-Day with the 101st Airborne.

Eve of Destiny by Richard Taylor.
 The Hurricane was the RAF's first fighter capable of flying at over 300mph and proved to be one of the most rugged fighters in the history of combat aviation.  Hurricanes fought with distinction in the Battle of France and, during the Battle of Britain, shot down more enemy aircraft than its famous counterpart, the Spitfire.  Richard Taylor's superb painting hints at the bitter fighting that lies ahead.  A few months ago they had been fighting for their lives during the Battle of Britain but for now the snow-clad tranquility of an English winter brings a brief, but welcome, relief for the Mk.1 Hurricane pilots of 87 Squadron.

Winter Combat by Richard Taylor.

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Signatures

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Gunther Rall

Johnnie Johnson

Bud Anderson

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Selected prints with Free Shipping

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Wide Horizons by Robert Taylor (AP)
Wide Horizons by Robert Taylor (AP)
Price : £135.00
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Wings of Glory by Robert Taylor (B)

Wings of Glory by Robert Taylor (B)
Price : £235.00
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Barque Glenogil off Liverpool Pierhead, 1900 by Robert Taylor.
Barque Glenogil off Liverpool Pierhead, 1900 by Robert Taylor.
Price : £150.00
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Royal Yacht Britannia by Robert Taylor.
Royal Yacht Britannia by Robert Taylor.
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The Battle of Trafalgar by Robert Taylor. (AP)
The Battle of Trafalgar by Robert Taylor. (AP)
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The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

 

 

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